Deprecated: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; plgContent123ContactForm has a deprecated constructor in /home/butlerma/public_html/howtoherbs.com/plugins/content/123contactform/123contactform.php on line 15

A simply delicious, quick and easy salmon recipe. Herb Crusted Salmon zips up a simple piece of fish into a special supper dish.

Imperative to this dish are shallots, do not substitute with onion as the flavour will be too strong. Shallots have a soft, sweetness that supports the dish rather than overwhelms.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 150ml extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed
  • 4-5 shallots, finely sliced into rings
  • 1 garlic clove, lightly crushed but still whole
  • 4 tbsp fresh flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped
  • 2 very ripe tomatoes, peeled, deseeded and finely chopped
  • 4 tbsp roughly chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
  • 1 lemon, zest and juice
  • For the oat crust:
  • 6 tbsp porridge oats
  • 2 tbsp medium oatmeal
  • 3 tbsp roughly chopped fresh chives
  • 1 free-range egg
  • 2 tbsp olive oil4 x 175g salmon fillets

Preparation:
Preheat the oven to 220C/425F/Gas 7.

  • First make the sauce base. Place the olive oil into a small pan over a low heat. Add the coriander seeds, shallots and garlic and cook gently for ten minutes without colouring. Remove the garlic clove from the sauce, then stir in the chopped tomatoes, a good squeeze of lemon juice (keeping some back for drizzling on the salmon) and 2 tbsp of the chopped parsley and set aside while you prepare the salmon.
  • To make the herb crust, place the oats, oatmeal, chives, the remaining parsley, 1 tablespoon of lemon zest and egg in a food processor and blitz for 20-30 seconds until damp and crumbly-looking.
  • Next heat the oil in an ovenproof non-stick frying pan over a high heat. Season the salmon fillets and place into the hot pan, skinned side uppermost. Sear the salmon for one minute then turn over. Quickly press the herb mixture on top of the salmon, drizzle with lemon juice, then transfer to the oven and cook for 4-5 minutes (depending on thickness), until the salmon is just cooked through and the crust is golden and crisp.
  • When cooked remove from the oven and place a salmon steak onto each serving plate, spooning the sauce around. Serve with buttered new potatoes.

Also called laurel leaf or bay laurel, this aromatic herb comes from the evergreen bay laurel tree, native to the Mediterranean. Early Greeks and Romans attributed magical properties to the laurel leaf and it has long been a symbol of honor, celebration and triumph, as in "winning your laurels."

The two main varieties of bay leaves are Turkish (which has 1- to 2-inch-long oval leaves) and Californian (with narrow, 2- to 3-inch-long leaves). The Turkish bay leaves have a more subtle flavour than do the California variety. Bay leaves are used to flavour soups, stews, vegetables and meats. They're generally removed before serving. Overuse of this herb can make a dish bitter.

The kaffir lime tree produces small, pear-shaped citrus fruit with a skin that's bright yellow-green, bumpy and wrinkled. The glossy, dark green kaffir lime leaves, which are used in cooking, have a unique double shape and look like two leaves that are joined end to end.

From a plant native to southern Asia, this fragrant herb looks like a small, shiny lemon leaf and has a pungent curry fragrance. Its flavour is essential in a substantial percentage of East Indian fare. Choose those that are bright green, with no sign of yellowing or wilting. They can be refrigerated in an airtight container up to 2 weeks.

Narrow, pointed, dark green leaves distinguish this perennial aromatic herb known for its distinctive anise like flavour. Tarragon is widely used in classic French cooking for a variety of dishes including chicken, fish and vegetables, as well as many sauces, the best known being béarnaise. It's also an integral ingredient in various herbal combinations such as fines herbs. Care should be taken when using tarragon since its assertiveness can easily dominate other flavours.

Greek for "joy of the mountain," this herb sometimes called wild marjoram, belongs to the mint family and is related to both marjoram and thyme. Oregano is similar to marjoram but is not as sweet and has a stronger, more pungent flavor and aroma. Because of its pungency, it requires a bit more caution in its use.

Mediterranean oregano is milder than the Mexican variety, which is generally used in highly spiced dishes. Choose bright-green, fresh-looking bunches with no sign of wilting or yellowing. Refrigerate in a plastic bag for up to 3 days. Oregano goes extremely well with tomato-based dishes and is a familiar pizza herb.

Thought by 1st-century Romans to be a good luck symbol, dill has been around for thousands of years. This annual herb grows up to a height of about 3 feet and has feathery green leaves called dill weed, marketed in both fresh and dried forms. The distinctive flavour of fresh dill weed in no way translates to its dried form. Fresh dill does, however, quickly lose its fragrance during heating, so should be added toward the end of the cooking time. Dill weed is used to flavour many dishes such as salads, vegetables, meats and sauces.

Related to the onion and leek, this fragrant herb has slender, vivid green, hollow stems. Chives have a mild onion flavour and are available fresh year-round. Look for those with a uniform green color and no signs of wilting or browning. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator up to a week. Fresh chives can be snipped with scissors to the desired length. They're delicious in many cooked dishes but should be added toward the end of the cooking time to retain their flavour. Both chives and their edible lavender flowers are a tasty and colorful addition to salads. Chives are a good source of vitamin A and also contain a fair amount of potassium and calcium.

Called the "royal herb" by ancient Greeks, this annual is a member of the mint family. Fresh basil has a pungent flavour that some describe as a cross between licorice and cloves. It's a key herb in Mediterranean cooking, essential to the delicious Italian pesto. Most varieties of basil have green leaves, but one "opal basil" is a beautiful purple color. Lemon basil and cinnamon basil have green leaves but their perfume fragrance and flavour matches their respective names.

Basil is a summer herb but can be grown successfully inside during the winter in a sunny window. It's plentiful during summer months and available year-round. Choose evenly colored leaves with no sign of wilting. Refrigerate basil, wrapped in barely damp paper towels and then in a plastic bag, for up to 4 days. Or store a bunch of basil, stems down, in a glass of water with a plastic bag over the leaves. Refrigerate in this manner for up to a week, changing the water every 2 days.

To preserve fresh basil, wash and dry the leaves and place layers of leaves, then coarse salt, in a container that can be tightly sealed. Alternatively, finely chop the cleaned basil and combine it with a small amount of olive oil. Freeze in tiny portions to flavour sauces, salad dressings.

Cool running water is the growing ground for this member of the mustard family, which can often be found in the wild in and around streams and brooks. Watercress has small, crisp, dark green leaves. Its pungent flavour is slightly bitter and has a peppery snap. Choose crisp leaves with deep, vibrant color. There should be no sign of yellowing or wilting. Refrigerate in a plastic bag (or stems-down in a glass of water covered with a plastic bag) for up to 5 days. Wash and shake dry just before using. Watercress may be used in salads, sandwiches, soups and a variety of cooked dishes. It's also a popular garnish, fast replacing the ubiquitous parsley.

Page 4 of 5